Posted in Nature, scandart sunday

Scandart Sunday: floral farewell

Whilst not being particularly fussy or finicky, I’ve decided to make this the final in my Scandart Sundays – at least on a regular basis. The fact is I’m rather precious about my printer/scanner and dislike the mess and risk of scratches. These flowers were soft enough but sticky with sycamore sap and aphids, and soon started to wilt and drop under the lightscollage of fresh flower scans and edits Hence the arrangement and scan is a little hasty as I wanted to retain as much freshness as possible, after having just picked them from the garden. I overhung the whole with an orange, chiffon scarf, with embroidered flower details. Perhaps the colour combo is a little mismatched with Red Campion blooms but it fitted well with purple Solanum and the tiny, rouge sprigs of shrubby honeysuckle.

After upping the detail and contrast, a Smart Photo edit of ‘Old postcard’ effect  toned down the orange hue and lent a vintage, Victorian look to the image…

… A fitting finale of floral flourish for this ‘F’  themed Scandart Sundayscandart sunday - fresh flowers

How fresh, oh Lord, how sweet and clean
Are thy returns! even as the flowers in spring;
To which, besides their own demean,
The late-past frosts tributes of pleasure bring.
Grief melts away
Like snow in May,
As if there were no such cold thing.
George Herbert

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Author:

playing with photography @ eljaygee whilst Tell Tale Therapy has a weakness for words

6 thoughts on “Scandart Sunday: floral farewell

  1. I like the results you achive but have a silly question, why do you use the scanner to photograph the image rather than your camera?

  2. Love the idea of Scandart – something unusual and fresh. And the result? Well, it caught my eye! This image has very vintage feel to it.

    P.S. A reply to your last comment on Red Pear (for some unknown reason it would let me post it where it should be posted):

    Don’t get me wrong, I loved your analyses! It’s just a bit scary that me, a self-taught “artist”, could produce something with blue shadows and create a background that helps to see the main subject better… 🙂 Maybe it’s just pure luck? We’ll have to analyse this process some more, right?

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